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In the Kitchen at the Arctic Restaurant

Wild Edible Mushrooms

King Bolete
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King Bolete or Cepe

(Boletus edulis)

Nutty and slightly meaty, King Bolete has a smooth and creamy texture. The sourdough-like aroma would make it a "must have" in Frederick Trump's Arctic Restaurant that would blend in well with the flavor of the Gold Rush. The young small porcini are highly prized by gourmets who suggest they should not be washed or peeled. They can eaten raw, sauteed with butter, put in pasta, in soups, and in many other dishes. They can be pickled, dried and even frozen. "The wild mushroom par excellence" - Antonio Carluccio.

Meadow Mushroom

(Agaricus Campestris)

The taste is mild. Odor is pleasant. Cook before eating. Agaricus bisporus (Button Mushroom), an edible look-alike, is the white mushroom found in grocery stores. The Meadow Mushroom can be sauteed, fried, put in sauces, and included in salads. We're confident that when offered by knowledgeable local mushroom pickers that this is one that Frederick Trump would carry in the Arctic Restaurant. Closely related species are dangerously toxic.

Meadow Mushroom
Image Source, Wikipedia

Mica Cap
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Mica Cap

(Coprinellus Micaceus)

The Mica Cap Mushroom appears in spring, summer, and fall. It has a mild taste and odor. Younger Mica Cap Mushrooms are preferred when they have the white gills. Washing with water shortly after collecting and store them in an airtight container to prolong their lifespan. Otherwise the gills blacken and dissolve. Ideal for omelettes and as a flavour for sauces, these mushrooms spoil when overcooked. Mica Cap Mushrooms may cause adverse reactions if consumed with alcohol so we doubt that they would be on the table of the Arctic Restaurant.

Saffron Milk Cap

(Lactarius Deliciosus)

Saffron Milk Cap in Poland are traditionally served fried in butter whereas in Spain it is suggested that you should never use butter and stick with olive oil. It can be served with cream, pickled, or marinated. It appears in late summer and fall in areas with conifers and grows singly or scattered. It has a mild to slightly acrid taste with an indistinct odor. Must be cooked before eating.

Saffron Milk Cap Mushroom
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Scaly Hedgehog Mushroom
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Scaly Hedgehog Mushroom

(Sarcodon Imbricatus)

Appearing in summer and fall in areas of conifers. Its taste can be mildly bitter, though not so much in younger specimens. Boiling in water will remove the bitterness. It can be pickled. Dried, it can be used as flavouring or ground into an aromatic mushroom flour like it's done in Bulgaria.

Shaggy Mane Mushroom

(Coprinus Comatus)

Shaggy Mane Mushroom grows in grassy areas over decaying wood, either scattered, or grouped together. It has no odor but a pleasant taste. Is an excellent edible mushroom if it is eaten soon after being collected when it is young. If the Arctic Restaurant had any Chinese clients, then they might have looked for this on the menu as it is cultivated for food in China. We doubt they would have found it as it requires immediate preparation for storage.

Shaggy Mane Mushroom
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Slimy Spike Cap Mushroom
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Slimy Spike Cap Mushroom

(Gomphidius Glutinosus)

Slimy Spike Cap Mushrooms grows abundantly in areas with conifers in the summer and fall. It has a mild pleasant flavour well-suited for soups and stews. It is not suitable as a dried mushroom. You must remove the cap's skin and cook before eating.

Yellow Swamp Russula Mushroom

(Russula Claroflava)

Yellow Swamp Russula Mushrooms have a mild taste and are considered very good while having a fruity smell. They appear in the summer and fall, mostly under birch or aspen trees, preferring damp places.

Yellow Swamp Russula Mushroom
Image Source, Wikipedia

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